Hackers terrify US family by broadcasting warning of incoming North Korean missiles through home surveillance camera 

Hackers terrify US family by broadcasting warning of incoming North Korean missiles through home surveillance camera 

But the family’s panic turned to anger when they learned that they had likely been the victims of hackers. 

Mrs Lyons claimed a Nest supervisor told her that there may have been a “third party hack” which had allowed someone to access their camera and its’ speakers through a compromised password. The employee allegedly said that there had been reports of multiple hacks in the last week. 

“We are curious to know why we didn’t get any notification that could have prevented us from experiencing a tremendous amount of anxiety, and more importantly our poor eight-year-old was scared to death,” she said. 

However, a spokesperson for Google, which owns Nest, said that Nest was not breached in this incident. 

“These recent reports are based on customers using compromised passwords (exposed through breaches on other websites). In nearly all cases, two-factor verification eliminates this type of security risk,” a Google spokesperson told Fox News. 

“We take security in the home extremely seriously, and we’re actively introducing features that will reject compromised passwords, allow customers to monitor access to their accounts and track external entities that abuse credentials.”

Mrs Lyons said that she had since deactivated the camera’s microphone. 

Last year, a false emergency alert about incoming North Korean missiles caused widespread panic in the state of Hawaii after residents were mistakenly warned through a mobile phone message about an impending attack. 

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