Kippers are making a comeback, claim supermarkets, as younger generation embraces high protein fish

Kippers are making a comeback, claim supermarkets, as younger generation embraces high protein fish

Kippers are making a comeback, supermarkets have claimed, as younger people embrace the healthy, sustainable breakfast food.
Once a staple part of the morning meal, the humble kipper fell out of fashion and was shunned by many. Now, it is enjoying somewhat of a renaissance.
New data from Waitrose supermarkets has shown a 6.5 per cent increase in kipper purchases over the last year, while Sainsbury’s has seen an over 100 per cent increase in searches for kipper products on its website in the same period. 
Jeremey Langley, Agriculture and Fisheries Manager at Waitrose & Partners said:  “Kippers were introduced as a breakfast delicacy back in the Edwardian days and were popular all the way up to the 1970s, before the crisis in the North Sea herring trade. Since then, their popularity has declined but we’re starting to see the first signs of a kipper renaissance.
“High in protein, low in calories and packed with nutritional benefits – more of our customers are buying kippers as part of a well-rounded diet. Although the increases are fairly modest now, they are growing and we think kippers could be a big food trend again in the next two to three years.” 
Stephanie Vince, Buyer for Fish at Sainsbury’s, added: “Kippers are a brilliant option for those looking for something quick and easy to cook, and we’ve seen a number of our customers exploring this popular oily fish as they continue to look for alternative, lighter breakfast options. We’ve seen a 109% increase year on year of customers searching for kipper bags on our website, as we continue to develop a range of distinctive products that add convenience for our customers cooking dishes at home.”
Independent fishmongers are also seeing an increase because they are a low-cost product and they are noted as a sustainable fish.
Rex Goldsmith, who runs The Chelsea Fishmonger in London, said: “Kipper sales seem to be slowly on the increase. I love it when French or Spanish people come in to buy them (it’s traditionally been the older English).
“Kipper are great because they are good for you, packed with flavour, inexpensive and herring stocks are good.” 
They are also having a resurgence on restaurant menus, with the top-placed restaurant in the Good Food Guide  L’Enclume in Grange-Over-Sands featuring kippers as a choice, and the third-placed Nathan Outlaw restaurant in Cornwall also serves the fish.
 

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