Schools with debating clubs or cadets to be rewarded under new chief inspection regime to help build resilience in young people, Ofsted chief says 

Schools with debating clubs or cadets to be rewarded under new chief inspection regime to help build resilience in young people, Ofsted chief says 

Schools with debating clubs or cadets are to be rewarded under the new inspection regime, as Ofsted seeks to help build resilience in young people.

Under the new draft framework, published today, inspectors will mark schools on how much they help children “develop their character” which includes their resilience, confidence and independence.

Ofsted is proposing to have a stand-alone category for “personal development” for the first time, as a way to encourage schools to prioritise extra-curricular activities.

This could include debating or public speaking societies, cadet forces, Duke of Edinburgh, or extra music or drama clubs.

Amanda Spielman, the chief inspector, said the move is intended to emphasise to headteachers that building resilience in young people is an integral part of education.

“It’s about making clear that education is not just about teaching a good set of academic subjects really well,” she said. “There is something a bit intangible and bigger than that, and it is making sure they recognise that.”

Ms Spielman said that inspectors would not reward schools for putting on any one particular extra-curricular activity, but rather they would look at the range of pursuits on offer.  

“It’s not about any one thing, it’s about having a range of opportunities so people can discover their talents and interests,” she said. “A good school or college has that range of activities, so that everybody can discover what they are good at.”

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