WW2  plane crash memorial to be honoured with fly past after pensioner sparked social media campaign

WW2  plane crash memorial to be honoured with fly past after pensioner sparked social media campaign

A pensioner who has regularly tended to a World War Two memorial honouring 10 airmen who died in a plane crash  75 years ago will see it be honoured with a military fly past next month.

Tony Foulds, 82, was just eight-years-old when he witnessed the American B-17 Flying Fortress crash into Endcliffe Park, Sheffield, on February 22 1944.

The plane was supposed to be dropping a 4,000 lb bomb on a Luftwaffe air station in Aalborg, Denmark, but it was ambushed by German fighters over the North Sea and was heavily damaged.

It was attempting to return to its base in Northamptonshire when it ended up off course over the skies of Sheffield before crashing.

Mr Foulds was one of a group of school children who were playing in Endcliffe Park when the plane come down. He said he felt responsible for the airmen’s deaths because the plane was trying to avoid crashing into them.

Since a memorial was erected in the 1970s, despite suffering from a severe tremor that makes his hands shake uncontrollably, the pensioner has regularly kept  the plants watered and the area clean to remember the men who died.

A huge social media campaign was launched  after he appeared on BBC Breakfast in early January thanks to an invite from presenter Dan Walker, who discovered Mr Foulds while walking his dog in Endcliffe Park.

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